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Nov 17, 2013
@ 11:09 pm
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92 notes

nprmusic:

Prince Paul with some real talk on Microphone Check's Eight Million Stories show about hip-hop in 1993. 

nprmusic:

Prince Paul with some real talk on Microphone Check's Eight Million Stories show about hip-hop in 1993

(via oneandonlykema)


Photo

May 25, 2013
@ 9:51 pm
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Quarters Only on Flickr.

Quarters Only on Flickr.


Photo

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:52 pm
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16 notes

mymanadoresme:

little rock school integration, 1957

mymanadoresme:

little rock school integration, 1957


Photo

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:48 pm
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87 notes

dimantez4ever:

BLACK WALL STREET Greenwood is a neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma. As one of the most successful and wealthiest African American communities in the United States during the early 20th Century, it was popularly known as America’s “Black Wall Street” until the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921. The riot was one of the most devastating race riots in history and it destroyed the once thriving Greenwood community. Within five years after the riot, surviving residents who chose to remain in Tulsa rebuilt much of the district. They accomplished this despite the opposition of many white Tulsa political and business leaders. It resumed being a vital black community until segregation was overturned by the Federal Government during the 1950s and 60s. Desegregation encouraged blacks to live and shop elsewhere in the city, causing Greenwood to lose much of its original vitality. Since then, city leaders have attempted to encourage other economic development activity nearby.

dimantez4ever:

BLACK WALL STREET

Greenwood is a neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma. As one of the most successful and wealthiest African American communities in the United States during the early 20th Century, it was popularly known as America’s “Black Wall Street” until the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921. The riot was one of the most devastating race riots in history and it destroyed the once thriving Greenwood community.

Within five years after the riot, surviving residents who chose to remain in Tulsa rebuilt much of the district. They accomplished this despite the opposition of many white Tulsa political and business leaders. It resumed being a vital black community until segregation was overturned by the Federal Government during the 1950s and 60s. Desegregation encouraged blacks to live and shop elsewhere in the city, causing Greenwood to lose much of its original vitality. Since then, city leaders have attempted to encourage other economic development activity nearby.


Photo

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:43 pm
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67 notes

artistic—suicide:

Yes do your thing boy. Make history

artistic—suicide:

Yes do your thing boy. Make history


Video

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:43 pm
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5 notes

rosetintedflowers:

Cathy Hughes, born Catherine Elizabeth Woods in Omaha, Nebraska on April 22, 1947, is an African-American entrepreneur, radio and television personality and business executive. Hughes founded the media company Radio One and later expanded into TV One, the company went public in 1998, making Hughes the first and only African-American female to head a publicly traded corporation at the time. In the 1980s, Hughes created the urban radio format called The Quiet Storm.

(via rosetintedflowers-deactivated20)


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Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:42 pm
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3,386 notes

nelleztheundercovernerd:

Say hello to Lonnie Johnson.
The inventor of the Super Soaker.

nelleztheundercovernerd:

Say hello to Lonnie Johnson.

The inventor of the Super Soaker.


Photo

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:42 pm
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13 notes

therealantoniasimone:

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT:
Reginald F. Lewis received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1968. He was a partner in Murphy, Thorpes & Lewis; the first black law firm on Wall Street. In 1989 he became president and CEO of TLC Beatrice International Food Company. Lewis became the head of the largest black-owned business in the United States. TLC Beatrice had revenues of $1.54 billion in 1992.

therealantoniasimone:

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT:

Reginald F. Lewis received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1968. He was a partner in Murphy, Thorpes & Lewis; the first black law firm on Wall Street. In 1989 he became president and CEO of TLC Beatrice International Food Company. Lewis became the head of the largest black-owned business in the United States. TLC Beatrice had revenues of $1.54 billion in 1992.


Photo

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:37 pm
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61 notes

fearfullymade-locs:

 
“My response to fear is: do it anyway. Let nothing stop you. You have to push forward.” February 3, 1956, Selma University and Miles College alum Autherine Lucy enrolled at the University of Alabama as a graduate student in library science, becoming the first African American ever admitted to a white public school or university in the state. She was however barred from all dormitories and dining halls.
On the third day of classes, a hostile mob assembled to prevent Lucy attending classes. The University suspended Lucy on the grounds that it could not provide a safe environment. Lucy and her attorney Thurgood Marshall filed suit against the University to have the suspension overturned. However, this suit was not successful and was used as a justification for her permanent expulsion. University officials claimed that Lucy had slandered the university and they could not have her as a student. It would be seven years before another black student would enroll at the University of Alabama. The University of Alabama finally overturned her expulsion in 1980, and in 1992, she earned her Masters degree in Elementary Education from the University that she had applied to decades earlier. The university named an endowed scholarship in her honor and unveiled a portrait of her in the student union overlooking the most trafficked spot on campus. The inscription reads “Her initiative and courage won the right for students of all races to attend the University”.

#blackhistory

fearfullymade-locs:

 

“My response to fear is: do it anyway. Let nothing stop you. You have to push forward.” February 3, 1956, Selma University and Miles College alum Autherine Lucy enrolled at the University of Alabama as a graduate student in library science, becoming the first African American ever admitted to a white public school or university in the state. She was however barred from all dormitories and dining halls.

On the third day of classes, a hostile mob assembled to prevent Lucy attending classes. The University suspended Lucy on the grounds that it could not provide a safe environment. Lucy and her attorney Thurgood Marshall filed suit against the University to have the suspension overturned. However, this suit was not successful and was used as a justification for her permanent expulsion. University officials claimed that Lucy had slandered the university and they could not have her as a student. It would be seven years before another black student would enroll at the University of Alabama. 

The University of Alabama finally overturned her expulsion in 1980, and in 1992, she earned her Masters degree in Elementary Education from the University that she had applied to decades earlier. The university named an endowed scholarship in her honor and unveiled a portrait of her in the student union overlooking the most trafficked spot on campus. The inscription reads “Her initiative and courage won the right for students of all races to attend the University”.

#blackhistory


Photo

Feb 3, 2013
@ 4:35 pm
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59 notes